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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)
that massive layoffs could cripple their economies. >> we don't need to wait to see the white in the eyes before we start responding because of the potential that we see. this challenge is real and real right now. >> reporter: well, with the deadline still nine days away, there's still a lot of posturing, and there's no sign that anyone's trying to make a deal. administration tells us that there are no secret talks or negotiations under way. the reason for that, of course, the obama administration thinks it's winning this debate and republican pressure will force republicans to give in. charlie, gayle? >> thanks. >>> cbs political correspondent john dickerson. good morning, john. >> good morning, charlie. >> put this for us in terms of what we're talking about and what we're not talking about. >> it's a good point. step back here. what we're not talking about in this sequester is the actual long-term drivers of this deficit problem so as people look at the fight, which is the 900th chap tur in the con stangt fights of the budget, what's happening is the debate about dumb cuts to a portion
universe. there are two economies in this country. there's the economies of all of us and the island, health care economy. we've had a pretty rough time over the last four or fives, six years in our economy. there's a lot of unemployment, a lot of pressure on us. not on that island. everybody just keeps making more money. >> jon: right. >> it's as if they don't exist in the universe and worst of all, the money they are making they are taking from all of us and bankrupting the country and it's bankrupting people. 60% of the personal bankruptcies in this country come from medical bills. >> jon: what is crazy to me is when you begin to tease it apart. when you begin to deconstruct it, it's made of sand. as i'm reading it's 36 pages. as you get higher and higher in the pages you feel like chuck yaeger breaking the sound barrier. i was like oh, my god. by page ten i was like i can't take it anymore. there's something -- you cannot believe this. there's something called the charge master. >> right. >> jon: and the charge master sets the price. so if you want an mri that's $6,000 according
that then goes out and stimulate the world economy like apollo and early space programs stimulated the economy of the world. i got an iphone on my hip that has 2000 times the memory of an apollo computer. can you imagine? the space station guys, they have texts, skype or something up there. and they're all on their laptops. it boggles your mind what is going on there technologically. >> today you could probably tweet what is going on on your flight. on your first and only flight, on the way back to earth, you got to do spacewalk. >> it was totally different. a different experience. as i described being on the moon, it contrasts the gray lunar surface with the blackness of space. people ask me what does the earth like from the moon? i said i cannot tell you because i landed in the center of the moon which took the earth directly overhead. in an apollo space suit, it is like being in a fishbowl. you move your head but the helmut does not move. so i did not get to see the earth very much from the moon. but in lunar orbit, you come around from the backside and there is the earth rise. we landed at
we all lived when the floor fell out of the 2008 economy. that was the detroit represented by the three big auto manufacturers whose failure would have symbolized to many of us the very failure of america, and that detroit as the obama for america campaign reminded us repeatedly, is now very much alive and kicking. but that detroit, the detroit we all want to see survive, exists in the entire country, not within any specific municipal bounds. then there is the literal detroit, the one where people live, the renaissance city founded initially in 1701. once it was a hub for mechanical manufacturing and detroit in the mid 20th century was a magnet for those looking for work. the city's population grew to more than 1.8 million residents in the 1950s. today, according to the latest census, detroit is the only -- the country's 18th largest city with just more than 700,000 inhabitants, for a city that covers almost 139 square miles. a space that san francisco, boston and manhattan could fit in with room to spare. there are so many factors contributing to the city's financial distr
its economy eventually was created, he has a job. details coming up. ♪ today is gonna be an impyou ready? for us. we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. shibani: get ready for it. moving coast to coast a winter storm now hammering places like kansas and nebraska. where is it heading next? we have the very latest. should i be getting my snow boots out for the weekend? >> that definitely depends on where you live. a lot of whether going on this afternoon. heavy snow continues to fall right around the st. louis area. that being mixed in with some sleep there. we are getting reports of anywhere from nine-11 inches already right around the kansas city area. this is an ice storm. very slippery conditions around springfield. that is likely to continue. the words of this storm likely to occur along i-34. that wi
a $15.8 trillion economy. it is one quarter percent of the size of our overall economy. dagen: do these need to happen, though, as far as a base line? if we let these have been and realize they are not hard on the economy, that could open the door for something more serious? >> they also need to have basic credibility. spending cuts are counted over ten years. they have not yet happened. these are clumsy cuts. it would be nice to have them replaced by more targeted cuts. it is better to have more cuts really in the bank taking place. like me saying i am going to go on a diet, but i am going to eat a big desert right now. i eat the calories now and i never get around to dieting later. dagen: do you believe that the markets, those still willing to lend money to the u.s., that they need to see movement in order to feel secure about, not just find that that, but continuing to own it at this point to be satisfied that we will try to at least begin to write ourselves financially. >> the problem is, the real things we need to address are the things that drive the debt of five years down
costs is one of the principal entitlement costs that unless reformed will bankrupt the economy. >> yes, but here's how to lower the cost. lower the age of medicare, not raise it. >> rose: you are opposed to raising it, so that you don't get medicare until you are older. >> if you want to raise the taxpayers money in the context of obama care and health-care system today, i make, i think, a fairly coghent argument in this article that if you lower the age to 64, there is a woman in hereho ends up in the emergency room, bridgeport hospital. who, no, the standford hospital who is 64 years old and 11 months. a month away from medicare. she's got no insurance. her bill is $21,000. medicare would have paid about $800 for that. now you say well, okay, but the taxpayers would have paid the $800ment she's going to pay the $21,000. first of all she is not. she is doesn't have the money. second under obama care, she will be required to have health insurance. she will pay much higher premiums because the big insurance companies, aetna, cigna, you name it, pay hospitals much, much more for that ser
of our economies, competition and so for us to all of a sudden pull up the gangplanks and worry about ourselves alone i think will bring the kind of problems that we saw before. nothing is a complete analogy, but i do think that there are some lessons learned from this. i do also believe that many americans do understand that we have a stake in what is happening in other countries. the part that i think we need to understand now is i believe in the strength of america. i think that we have a huge role to play in the world but i don't see why we have to do everything alone and so i very much agree with the approach of having partners where we can, in fact, help in other parts of the world together. that would be my shortest version of what i believe in and that i really do think while i understand the pain of people in this country i think only solution to resolving it is for us to be active internationally with others. >> rose: one question is whether that's what the rest of the world wants. many people come here and say yes, in fact, when they talk to foreign leaders, they do not wan
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sanctions been on iranian behavior. >> well they certainly affected the economy, had a huge effect on the economy and led to the devaluation of the iranian currency. but it's an excellent question because there's some talks coming up now in kazakhstan of all places in late february involving the eu, the united states and the iranians. and so this is going to be a venue in which people are going to be able to see to a certain extent how serious iran is about negotiating on limits on its nuclear program. there hasn't been negotiations for some significant period of ti. and this is an opportunity to test the iranians. i think this initial round is not going to prove much but certainly over the next six months, i think there will be an ample opportunity to see if there is an intent on the iranian part to reach some sort of compromise. >> rose: leon panetta and others have said the following. we have no information that there's been a decision on the part of the iranian government and the most influential people there to builds a nuclear weapon and a missile that will deliver it. what
. >> what are they saying and what are they saying about the economy? >> looking backward they're saying walmart had a very good christmas. they earned more than expected. they came in light on sales. however, going forward that's really a question. walmart is considered a bellwether for our economy and what they told us this morning is that the payroll tax cut is impacting consumers. the hike that we saw at the beginning of the year the 2% hike which takes about $20 out of people's weekly paycheck is hitting the consumer and gasoline prices are up 50 cents in the last month and there's a tell prey knock on the consumer right now because refunds have been delayed. the tax code had to be overhauled as a result of the many of the reforms of last year and they're saying their consumer has been hit by delays in the refund checks about $20 billion in refund checks didn't go out on time. >> all right. new information. rebe rebecca rebecca, thank you. >>> the obama administration plans fines, penalties, and trade sanctions against any government that sponsors hacking.
this is a good time for the economy. are you kidding? it is not a great sign for the economy. dell? michael dell try to take back his own company, looking to do some things behind the scenes, but no takeover battle and higher battle. heinz was more of a world deal. not seen the kind of things we're looking for. the market is grappling for things. what i wanted to kind of talk about with the audience is key members on the downside. let's talk about the key support levels. it is a key number that i like to see if we drift on no news, the market to make a stand, the number that must hold the moving average, let's just call it 13,600. if for any reason we get hurt and got out to that level, that is the market must make a stand. certainly want to see the market make a stand. once all the news went away, some form of analysts. would find a way to go up but so far has not been able to find a catalyst. and i'm a little bit nervous on the talks of sequestration. the president yesterday was talking if the white house those things are getting bad and just trying to set up the escape hatch so they cannot bl
this morning. it's a bellwether for the nation's economy. rebecca jarvis is here with us. what are they saying about the economy? >> looking backwards walmart had a good christmas, that holiday sales worked out well for them they earned more than wall street was expecting, they came in a little light on sales. however, going forward, that's really the question walmart is considered a bellwether for our overall economy and what they told us this morning is that the payroll tax cut is impacting consumers, that pike that we saw at the beginning of the year the 2% hike that takes about $20 out of people's weekly paychecks, that's getting their consumer also gasoline price is up 50 cents in the last month, that's hitting consumers and there's a temporary knock on the consumer because refunds have been delayed. the tax code had to be overhauled as a result of many of the reforms at the end of last year and they're saying their consumer has been hit by delays in the refund checks about $20 billion in refund checks didn't go out on time. >> new information this morning rebecca t
technology has seeped into more and more crevices and nooks of the economy. because when i started at sequoia capital there's no way that we would have considered investing in a payments company, a financial services company, a media company. an advertising company. all of those sorts of things we've invested in quite happily in the last 15 years. it was technology and-- seeping out everywhere. >> rose: at the core of every business. >> exactly. and where technology goes, we follow. >> rose: you've been outspoken or at least you've made public statements saying wait, don't be so critical of apple because of the decline in the stock price. you believe in the future of apple and there's nothing, no reason not to be excited about the continued growth of that company. >> i'm not a soothsayer. all i was trying to do in the pandemonium after they announced their results recently was just try to paint a picture of realistic expectations for a company that is now as large as apple is. and-- . >> rose: second largest company in the world. >> and the point that i was making was that if the growth rate
by one. number one, chapter one. earth inc, a new interconnected, global economy that operates as if it is a single entity. we've been seeing the outsourcing of jobs, and we've been seeing the connection of the supply side, and now we have virtual factories with supply lines running to hundreds of countries and almost every business has to see its competitive landscape in the global dimension. earth inc.has a different relationship to national government and national economic policies now, a different relationship to labor and capital and natural resources, the three classic factors of production. look, for example, one of the changes that illustrates this new really of effort inc. , and normally after a recession when we get a recovery and growth resumes, the jobs come back, and that's the way it's always been, but in the last couple of recessions, it had not happened that way because we now have this gloanl reality, and -- global reality, and some businesses that lay people off in the recession, they are not hiring them back the way they used to. some of them, yes, but we now
force that will help the united states compete and win in a global economy. it will not be easy or gentle. it will not be quick. it will require a struggle over power and money. my grandmother asked how hard can that be? very." so tell me about the struggle th has to be fough well -- >> engaged. >> look at where we are as a country. we are ranked 14th, 17th, and 25th out of all developed nations in reading, science and math respectively. our 25th ranking in math puts us behind countries like hungary and slovakia, which is -- i mean this is just not who we are as a nation. and in order to -- >> rose: not what made us great. >> no. and it's not going to make u eat the fure unless we fix it. and i think that, you know, if you look at america today we have one of the lowest social mobility rates in the entire world. meaning if you are a child born into poverty in this country, the chances you will ever escape poverty are not good. which i think goes counter to everything we believe in as a country. so what's at stake is the lives of kids and the values of this nation which i think
it will be good for the economy. guess what, you fund solyndra instead of shovel ready projects. i will say this: the president is at his worst when he is most liberal. when the republicans actually won the house and picked up seats in the senate it's when he pushing for his big government agenda. when he backed off of that, that is when barack obama seems more reasonable. i think he is going to shoot himself in the foot with this stuff. >> neil: this is part of a much bigger problem that is coming across from prominent democrats not only avoiding the spending problem but dismissing it as problem at all. >> it is almost a false argument to say that we have a spending problem. >> i want to disagree with those that say we have a spending problem. when they talked about that, it's like there is an assumption somehow we as a nation is broke. >> neil: what do you think of that? >> i just could sense in my bones we were coming to nancy pelosi first on this subject. >> neil: i could have picked half a dozen prominent democrats. i chose her because of the eyes. [ laughter ] >> neil: you have to admit th
just spend the money on stimulus, we don't care where it goes. it will be good for the economy and guess what, you fund solyndra and it's a shovel ready projects as we know that happened. i will say this, the president generally, politically is at his worse when he's the most liberal. if you look at when the republicans actually looke at the house and picked up seats in the senate when he was pushing his big government agenda. when he backed off of that, the second year, year and a half. that's when president obama seems a lot more reasonable. i think he's overshooting and going to shootimself in the foot. >> adam. i want to get-- i think this is personal though. a much bigger problem that's coming across from prominent democrats, not only avoiding the spending problem, but dismissing it as a problem as all. let's listen to some reaction. >> it's almost a false argument to say we have a spending problem. >> i want to disagree with those who say we have a spending problem. >> and we have a spending problem. >> and when he talk about that, like there's an assumption that somehow,
that massive layoffs would cripple their economies. >> we don't need to wait to see the white in their eyes to start responding because of the potential that we see. this challenge is real and real right now. >> with the deadline still nine days away there's a lot of posturing going on and no sign anyone is trying to make a deal. officials tell us there are no secret negotiations under way. one reason for that the obama administration thinks it is winning this debate and public pressure will force the republicans to give in. charlie, gayle? >> bill plante thanks. >>> also in washington cbs news political director john dickerson. john, good morning. >> good morning, charlie. >> put this thing in context for us in terms of what we are talking about and what we're not talking about. >> well you know it's a good point. step back here. what we're not talking about in this sequester is the actual long-term drivers of this deficit problem, and so as people look at this fight, which is the 900th chapter in the constant fights over the budget what's happening is a debate about dum
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 76 (some duplicates have been removed)